The passions of andrew jackson by andrew burstein review

Jackson at times appears as a Dickensian caricature rather than a human being. How this brash frontiersman took Washington by storm makes a fascinating story, and Burstein tells it thoughtfully and expertly.

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Remini definitely liked and admired Jackson, and found reason--or excuses--for most of his most questionable actions, such as the Indian removal. Yet when he was declared a national hero upon his stunning victory at the Battle of New Orleans, Jackson suddenly found the presidency within his grasp.

Burstein, on the other hand, did a better job of hiding his personal opinion, describing Jackson as argumentative, stubborn Excellent analysis of Jackson, his background, and the cultural forces that shaped his behavior. That being said, Burstein also names Andrew Jackson as one of the three most important presidents of the early years, on par with Washington and Jefferson.

Add to Cart About The Passions of Andrew Jackson Most people vaguely imagine Andrew Jackson as a jaunty warrior and a man of the people, but he was much more—a man just as complex and controversial as Jefferson or Lincoln.

Jackson is posited as the new style of president, a violent change from the patrician gentility and cultured intellectualism of Washington and Jefferson.

He was a leader when one was badly needed, and surrounded himself with competent men who were expected to agree with him, but who could fill niches where he lacked skills. Yet, even here, the relationship is focused on scandal so that Jackson at his tenderest seems more concerned with saving face than a man of true feeling.

The unabashedly aggressive Jackson came of age in the Carolinas during the American Revolution, migrating to Tennessee after he was orphaned at the age of fourteen. About The Passions of Andrew Jackson Most people vaguely imagine Andrew Jackson as a jaunty warrior and a man of the people, but he was much more—a man just as complex and controversial as Jefferson or Lincoln.

Little more than a poorly educated frontier bully when he first opened his public career, he was possessed of a controlling sense of honor that would lead him into more than one duel.

As a lover, he fled to Spanish Mississippi with his wife-to-be before she was divorced. Worth reading, this book gives a picture of Andrew Jackson as a man driven by his passions. Burstein, on the other hand, did a better job of hiding his personal opinion, describing Jackson as argumentative, stubborn, etc.

In this new populist, pioneering, self-reliant and self-aggrandizing mode, Burstein perceives warnings of the civil unrest to come. This one-sidedness lends the book a certain amount of focus, but at the same time flirts with exaggeration.

Now, with the first major reinterpretation of his life in a generation, historian Andrew Burstein brings back Jackson with all his audacity and hot-tempered rhetoric.The Passions of Andrew Jackson by Andrew Burstein Most people vaguely imagine Andrew Jackson as a jaunty warrior and a man of the people, but he was much more—a man just as complex and controversial as Jefferson or Lincoln/5(5).

Yet, while on the whole, THE PASSIONS OF ANDREW JACKSON is an enjoyable book, it also contains a major disappointment: Burstein's treatment of Jackson's presidency.

Burstein set out to write a book about Jackson's character with an emphasis on exploring his friendships. The Passions of Andrew Jackson [Andrew Burstein] on mi-centre.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Most people vaguely imagine Andrew Jackson as a jaunty warrior and a man of the people, but he was much more—a man just as complex and controversial as Jefferson or Lincoln/5(13).

About The Passions of Andrew Jackson. Most people vaguely imagine Andrew Jackson as a jaunty warrior and a man of the people, but he was much more—a man just as complex and controversial as Jefferson or Lincoln.

Feb 25,  · ''The Passions of Andrew Jackson'' offers a challenging, disturbing portrait of a democratic hero, and an equally challenging case study of the democratic system. Correction: March 12, The Books of The Times review on Feb. 25, about ''The Passions of Andrew Jackson'' by Andrew Burstein, included an anachronistic reference to the Oval Office.

Burstein explores the life and times of Old Hickory in his consistently illuminating new book, The Passions of Andrew Jackson. Politics in Jackson's day was vicious and often violent, and he.

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The passions of andrew jackson by andrew burstein review
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