Topographical features at divergent and convergent

Instead, it fills the fissure and solidifies. Another feature is known as a graben where two normal faults occur on opposite side of a section of the lithosphere. Trenches Trenches are geological features formed Topographical features at divergent and convergent convergent boundaries.

Deep sea trenches, volcanic islands and fold mountains are exclusive to convergent margins. If rifting continues, a new ocean basin could be produced.

Constructive plate margins are the complete opposite of divergent margins. Hire Writer There are several topographical features found at divergent plate margins some of which are due to faulting.

Ridges Opposite of a convergent boundary, a divergent boundary is formed by the spreading of a tectonic plate. As these plates slowly move about, they interact with each other, forming boundary zones.

This process feeds magma to the surface, creating new crust. When two oceanic plates converge, both a trench and a string of volcanoes are formed. The Marianas Trench is an example of a trench formed by the convergence of two oceanic plates. Sciencing Video Vault Volcanoes Another geological feature that results from a subduction zone is volcanoes.

This rift can then grow deeper and wider. These volcanoes can build to produce island chains, such as the Mariana Islands, which are located alongside the Marianas Trench. Visit the Interactive Plate Boundary Map to explore satellite images of divergent boundaries between oceanic plates.

Both also show faulting however divergent plate margins have normal faults versus the reverse faults found at convergent margins. Volcanic activity sometimes occurs within the rift. The Mid-Atlantic Ridge is a classic example of this type of plate boundary. These ranges main difference to divergent plate margin ranges are the mountains formed here grow exceedingly taller.

Ultimately, they will form the floor of a new ocean. One well known example of this is the East African Rift Valley. This refers to the compaction of rock upon rock due to compression forces.

Divergent zones in oceanic plates form a geological feature called a ridge, forced upward by the pressure of the rising magma. This trench develops directly above the subduction zone. Divergent Plate Boundary - Continental When a divergent boundary occurs beneath a thick continental plate, the pull-apart is not vigorous enough to create a clean, single break through the thick plate material.

How to cite this page Choose cite format: The most commonly know example of this feature is the Mid-Atlantic Ridge which is located between Africa and South America.

The final feature which is formed due to divergent plate margins are volcanoes. The Himalayas, one of the tallest mountain ranges in the world, is an example of a geological feature that is formed when continental plates collide.

Another aspect that influences topography at these margins is folding. In this instance the more dense oceanic plate subducts below the continental plate. Over time these volcanoes can grow as one of the plates continues to subduct, causing more and more magma to be pushed to the surface to form volcanic islands such as Montserrat.

These depressions slowly fill with water, forming lakes, as their level drops. Fault Lines A transform boundary connects two diverging boundaries, creating a fault line. An example of this type of geological feature is the East African Rift Zone. The magma then solidifies and the process repeats itself.

This leads to the formation of deep sea trenches a feature not found at divergent plat margins. This folding has led to large mountain ranges such as the Alps. Ultimately, this pressure causes large vertical and horizontal displacements, forming towering mountain ranges.Divergent and convergent plate margins are both studied in plate tectonics; which is the study of the plates that makeup the lithosphere, their movements and how these movements has influenced changes in the surface’s topography (Strahler,).

Divergent plate boundaries are locations where plates are moving away from one another. This occurs above rising convection currents.

Divergent Plate Boundaries

The rising current pushes up on the bottom of the lithosphere, lifting it and flowing laterally beneath it. Video: Plate Boundaries: Convergent, Divergent, and Transform Boundaries In the theory of plate tectonics, the earth's crust is broken into.

Start studying Characteristics of Plate Boundaries. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. Opposite of a convergent boundary, a divergent boundary is formed by the spreading of a tectonic plate.

Topographical Features at Divergent and Convergent Plate Margins Essay

This process feeds magma to the surface, creating new crust. Divergent zones in oceanic plates form a geological feature called a ridge, forced upward by the pressure of the rising magma.

In summary the Divergent and Convergent plate margins have similar and different topographical features that would have been formed or is still forming as a result of tectonic plate movement.

The similarities are volcanoes and mountain ranges while the differences are rift valleys and ocean trenches.

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Topographical features at divergent and convergent
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